Psychology Personal Statement Starters

Fine tuning the opening sentence of your personal statement is a task most students dread, particularly because so much attention is given to the opening sentence as it should catch the reader’s attention. You’re told that there needs to be a wow factor involved and that your sentence should set the tone and quality of the rest of the personal statement. No pressure, eh?

In fact, writing a strong opening sentence is relevant to more than just university applicants. You'll also need a strong opening statement for applying for an apprenticeship or a school leaver scheme so sorry guys, you’re not off the hook.

We’re not going to lie — the opening sentence is pretty important, but it’s also important that the personal statement doesn’t go downhill from there. Think of your personal statement like a football team — even if you have the best goal scorer in the world, if you have a dodgy defence or mildly-interested midfield, it’s not a great recipe for success.

Overused Opening Sentences

Whatever you do with your opening sentence, make sure you use something different to the most overused statements.

“But how do I know which opening sentences are the most overused?” I hear you cry. Well, we did some research and found an article by UCAS that listed the most overused opening sentences. Here they are:

1. From a young age I have (always) been [interested in/fascinated by]… (used 1,779 times)

2. For as long as I can remember I have… (used 1,451 times)

3. I am applying for this course because… (used 1,370 times)

4. I have always been interested in… (used 927 times)

5. Throughout my life I have always enjoyed… (used 310 times)

6. Reflecting on my educational experiences… (used 257 times)

7. Nursing is a very challenging and demanding [career/profession/course]… (used 211 times)

8. Academically, I have always been… (used 168 times)

9. I have always wanted to pursue a career in… (used 160 times)

10. I have always been passionate about… (used 160 times)

11. Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world… (used 148 times)

The (over)use of the quote from Nelson Mandela about “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” is particularly cringe worthy — if you’re going to include a quote, make sure it’s more than just a popular quote that you once saw on Instagram. Show that you’ve done some reading around the subject and be prepared to properly explain why you like a particular quote.

Writing Your Opening Sentence

Aside from avoiding overused quotes and words such as ‘passionate’ or ‘deeply fascinated’, we recommend being original and referring to personal experiences as a way to draw attention.

For example, if you were writing a personal statement for a History course, you could open with something like, “Making an evacuation suitcase at the age of nine made me realise for the first time how historical events had affected real people.”

Not only does this draw on personal experience and highlight your knowledge of a certain area of history, it also provides you with an opening to elaborate upon your interest in social history. If you already know what graduate job or scheme you want to pursue after university, then you can further relate your opening anecdote to your future plans.

Don’t sit in front of a blank page for ages and furiously try to come up with the perfect opening sentence. If you’re stuck on your opening sentence, then perhaps try writing it last. After all, writing the rest of your personal statement will allow you to see the finished piece before adding the token opening sentence. The best opening sentences refer to your experiences, so think hard about what stands out in your memories in regards to your relationship with your chosen subject. Jot them down and then make one of these memories attention grabbing for someone who doesn’t know you.

Opening sentences are tricky, but they don’t make or break a personal statement. For more information on how to write a personal statement, check out these articles:

Don’t assume your work experience is irrelevant

Due to confidentiality surrounding the industry, it can be hard to get experience in the area you're interested in. But don’t assume your work experience is unrelated just because you haven't shadowed a professional. Instead, focus on the skills you've developed.

If you’ve volunteered in a school, you can talk about development, learning, memory or learning disabilities, for example. If you spent two weeks helping out at a psychiatric hospital, you can discuss your responsibilities there.

If you’re applying to something more specific like criminology, even your part-time job might be more relevant than you think. Kim Sadique, interim head of community and criminal justice division at De Montfort University, explains:

"If you’re applying for criminology, make sure to tell us about your volunteering or employment - even if you think it’s not relevant. Working in a retail environment, a pub or shop for example, can be used to demonstrate criminology-related skills such as dealing with conflict/challenging behaviour as well as understanding and working within the law."  

If you’ve still got some time before you need to complete your statement and you're worried about your lack of work experience, you could approach some local charities. Addiction charities; those for children with special educational needs; dementia charities or mental health charities will all provide invaluable experience, and usually are open all year round for volunteers.

Just remember to write what you gained or how you developed from any additional experience, so that you can add it to your personal statement. After all, binge-watching CSI or Law & Order unfortunately doesn’t count...

 

Are you applying for a psychology course?

Do you have any extra tips to add? Join in with the comments below.

 

 

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